Opinion

The Lowe Down

The Lowe Down

Among the many things the pandemic has done, it has shone a light on educational areas of weakness. Any time vulnerability is found, it’s a good thing. We can’t fix something we don’t know is in need of it. One area of weakness that gained attention is the lack of internet access in learners’ homes. Citizens of rural areas of the state knew this shortcoming before COVID-19, but the prospect of reliable access seemed elusive. Since school buildings were closed last spring and the Internet finally appeared to be vital to learning during this time, some movement may be made toward that end.

Learn, Unlearn, Relearn . . .

Learn, Unlearn, Relearn . . .

Many inventions and products have been discovered due to failed experiments that produced unintended results. Educators spend their careers teaching children that trying new things and failing is a part of the learning process. Learn. Unlearn. Relearn. The act of failing produces the most valuable lessons and solutions in life and in learning.

RAMBLING VINES

RAMBLING VINES

Canning season. It used to be fun for the first day, then it got to be old stuff when it interfered with playing with friends. I used to be the fruit jar washer because my hands were just the right size to get inside a glass fruit jar. I have washed tubs of fruit jars in one day – I didn’t come any ways near killing me but I never did learn to like it. I always wanted to trade jobs with someone else and get to put the food inside the jars. My mom used to dread canning season, more because of the fact that it heated up the house until it would be too hot to rest at night; I am talking back to the days of wood-burning cook stoves, no airconditioning and very few fans, other than cardboard ones made, mostly, from the kid of a shoe box or a school tablet back. A lot sweat was mopped away with an apron tail those days!

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True freedom comes in doing what’s right . . .

In times like these we need people who stand up for what is right, who are willing to clear the haze of misinformation and look out for others. It could be you going about your business in town wearing a mask to protect others. Just when you think there are few people who are willing to work for the good of others along comes someone like Misty Orphin. Misty’s work with virus data is detailed in a front page story in this edition of the Courier. Her work is invaluable in learning about the COVID-19 numbers for our county that the governor and Dr. Nate Smith do not have time to explain in their updates.

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RAMBLING VINES

I met Martin E. Lee from Troy, Michigan during the 4th of July. He was visiting here and other places and was joined by other family members for a reunion. He is a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Schuyler Lee who lived on Highway 62 between here and Knobel for many years.

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Clay County Courier

810 N Missouri Ave.
P.O. Box 85
Corning, Arkansas 72422-0085
(870) 857-3531