Opinion

Rambling Vines

Rambling Vines

Friend Lilly, Ole Blu and I made a sashay in the mountain and forest areas in neighboring Missouri, Sunday, to see all the beautiful blooming dogwoods. They were a sight to behold. After about 50 miles of nature’s beauty, I told her that it was a good thing we didn’t start out trying to count the dogwood. I mean to tell you they are thick as fleas in that area.

Your mind is where you live . . .

Your mind is where you live . . .

I have fond memories of being a senior in Corning High School many years ago. When school began that fall the list of events and activities that would be our last as a student at CHS grew until our graduation on May 25, 1979. Every time we would participate in something someone would invariably say, “This is the last time we will…”. These little statements served as a reminder to cherish those times as they would be gone soon and they were. The Class of 2020 was also about two months away from completing that bittersweet list of last times to participate in high school activities when social distancing was enforced and school closed for the year. Suddenly life changed and turned everyone’s world upside down. The rug was pulled out from under the senior class and they were robbed of the way they would normally culminate a senior year.

RAMBLING VINES

RAMBLING VINES

Was nibbling on dried apple pieces the other day when I offered some to a co-worker who sort of wrinkled up her nose before deciding to give it a try. I tried to convince her that eating dried apples, or any dried fruit, would cut down on the cooking and dish washing, eat a bit of the dried fruit for breakfast, drink lots of water for dinner and swell up for supper!! Of course, she thinks I have a screw or two loose, but that’s okay.

Dream a little dream . . .

Dream a little dream . . .

In the past year and half or so, Corning residents have been working on bringing glory back to our city. Even though we may be enjoying some respite from meetings and activities, one downside has been that our progress has temporarily stalled due to social distancing. This break in our action does not mean we have to stop dreaming. Besides dreaming is fun and gives us a break from thinking about COVID-19. Here are some of my thoughts involving the revitalization of our fair city.

Succumb or surmount . . .

Succumb or surmount . . .

The news arrived this week that we all knew was bound to come, but hoped it wouldn’t; there is a confirmed case of COVID-19 in the county. Officials have been stressing the importance of social distancing. We have many people in our county who shoulder the responsibility of doing all they can to prevent people from becoming infected. Everyone that I’ve spoken with about the virus is concerned and worried. Some have lost sleep over whether we’ve done all we can. The thing is every official can order supplies take precautions and put plans into place, but if we don’t do our part, it’s to no avail. We have the choice of either succumbing or surmounting this pandemic. While there are some risks we all have to take in public places or the workplace, it’s up to us as individuals to do our best because when we protect ourselves and our own, we also protect others. Like many other families, mine hasn’t gathered together in what seems like months. I want to protect my parents, who are in a vulnerable age bracket. I couldn’t forgive myself if I thought I brought the virus to them. I have a niece who is pregnant with her second child. I’m especially worried about her and her little family. Her husband, my nephew, works at night in a place where many people also work. Each morning when he comes home, he takes off his boots so as not to contaminate the house; he removes his clothes right away and places them in the washer. My sister then disinfects the doorknobs, floor and surfaces. They are doing all they can to protect our family. I have another niece in the healthcare field. I worry about her. She also takes similar precautions after work so she doesn’t infect her children, husband and her parents. I have two nephews employed in the agri-field. There’s risk. My bunch is doing all they can as many of yours are too. If you love someone, then you understand the importance of what Mayor Ahrent, Judge Patterson, Sheriff Miller, Alan Vaughn - 911 Operator, Brigitte McDonald - CEO of 1st Choice Healthcare, police officers, deputies, first responders, and healthcare workers in our area implore us to do; stay 6 feet away from others, remain at home when possible, wash our hands often, wear masks and only go to the store when needed with one person entering the store.

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Clay County Courier

810 N Missouri Ave.
P.O. Box 85
Corning, Arkansas 72422-0085
(870) 857-3531